MIDDLE SCHOOL Sex Ed

Screenshots from advocatesforyouth.org

 

Curriculum Excerpts

There are two important things you need if you choose to engage in anal sex: condoms and lubrication. Unlike the vagina, the anus does not naturally lubricate itself, so it’s important that you use a water-based lubricant in order to prevent tearing and pain. Similarly, because the anus tears easily, this can make it more prone to infection. STDs can be spread through anal sex, but the correct use of a condom can significantly reduce risk. Using condoms and lubricant should make anal sex more pleasurable and safe.

CDE Framework Chapter 5, Grade Seven & Eight

Page 20
The CHYA lists many required topics including information on the safety and effectiveness of all FDA-approved contraceptive methods, all legally available pregnancy options, HIV and other STIs, gender identity, sexual orientation, healthy relationships, local health resources, and pupils’ rights to access sexual health and reproductive health care.

Instruction and materials on sexual health content must affirmatively recognize diverse sexual orientations and include examples of same-sex relationships and couples.


Page 24
Students in seventh and eighth grade tend to appreciate and welcome the perspectives a guest speaker brings. Guest speakers from your local public health department, sexual health clinic, or local nonprofit organizations, such as Planned Parenthood.

Classroom Example: Sexual Health and Healthy Relationships Scenarios

Some of the scenarios Ms. G (the teacher) shares are:
Two students are at a party. One asks the other for oral sex.

Page 29-30
Medically accurate resources and photos from Mayo Clinic, the CDC, ACOG, or Planned Parenthood can be referenced.

Decision Making: 7–8.5.7.G Use a decision-making process to evaluate the value of using FDA-approved condoms for pregnancy and STD prevention.

Barrier Method Demonstration

A condom (internal/female and external/male condom) and dental dam demonstration is provided. After the demonstration, students individually practice the step-by-step process on a penis model or their fingers.

Using free health education brochures and tip sheets printed from reliable online resources or local organizations and agencies…….TeenSource, a project of California-based Essential Access Health; Healthy Teen Network; Planned Parenthood; CDC; and Advocates for Youth.

Page 31
Students understand from learning in earlier grade levels that gender is not strictly defined by biology and sexual anatomy.

Health education teachers and other educators must be mindful of personal biases and use gender-neutral language when discussing peer and romantic relationships. It is important not to assume a student’s identified gender pronoun based on sex assigned at birth or appearance.

The term “partner” should be used in place of or in addition to “boyfriend/girlfriend” or “husband/wife” to avoid assumptions about gender and sexual orientation. Some students may be non-monogamous and the term “partner(s)” may also be used to be more inclusive.

Students build upon previous learning and understanding of the differences in growth and development, physical appearance, and perceived gender roles, extending their understanding beyond peer relationships to exploring the dynamics of romantic relationships, including all relationships regardless of the sexual orientation of people.

Not only is this recognition important for the inclusion of all students, but it is also critical for creating a safe environment with an expectation of empathy, sensitivity, and understanding in which differences are celebrated and accepted. The exploration of individual identity, sexuality, and self-expression is a normal part of growth and development for students in middle grades.

Page 52
Plan a campus awareness event for World AIDS Day (December 1) to educate peers and help to dispel common stereotypes about people living with HIV (7–8.8.2.G, Health Promotion). Partner with the GSA Network (transgender and queer youth uniting for racial and gender justice) to create an LGBTQ+ student-run club (7–8.8.1.G, Health Promotion).

Page 53
This resource guide can also provide information about laws regarding minor access to reproductive health care, including confidential release from school to obtain sensitive services without parental notification and permission.

From Planned Parenthood Website

What If…?
A Lesson Plan from Rights, Respect, Responsibility: A K-12 Curriculum

TARGET GRADE: Middle School – Lesson 8

STEP 3: Say, “In the video we just saw, Emily finds out she’s pregnant and they both just kind of assume she’s going to have the baby and they’re going to become parents.” Write “Become a Young Parent” on the whiteboard. Say, “Many people do make this choice, regardless of whether they’re teens or adults. There are also two other choices someone who is pregnant has the right to consider—what are they?” Probe for and write on the board, “Place a Baby for Adoption” and “End a Pregnancy,” i.e., have an abortion.”

Step 6 Homework:

Instructions: Answer the questions below, using any of the following three websites. Be sure to include the link to where you found the information!

  • http://www.plannedparenthood.org/teens
  • http://www.plannedparenthood.org/learn/pregnancy/prenatal-care
  • http://sexetc.org

Say,….Now, if they choose not to continue the pregnancy and have an abortion, they also need to do that as early in the pregnancy as possible. Minors in California have the right to obtain an abortion without notifying their parents or any other adult if they do not wish to.”

This lesson suggests using the sexetc.org website. Examples below are taken from it.

There are two important things you need if you choose to engage in anal sex: condoms and lubrication. Unlike the vagina, the anus does not naturally lubricate itself, so it’s important that you use a water-based lubricant in order to prevent tearing and pain. Similarly, because the anus tears easily, this can make it more prone to infection. STDs can be spread through anal sex, but the correct use of a condom can significantly reduce risk. Using condoms and lubricant should make anal sex more pleasurable and safe.

 

Some superheroes don’t wear capes; sometimes they wear plastic packaging. Their goal isn’t to save the world and destroy an entire city while doing so but to keep people safe, healthy and happy. From reducing the risk of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) to pregnancy prevention, these safer sex and birth controlcrusaders are ready to step in and save the day whenever you need them. It’s like having the Avengers on speed dial—but even better.

Reproduction Basics

A Lesson Plan from Rights, Respect, Responsibility: A K-12 Curriculum

TARGET GRADE:
Middle School – Lesson 4

 it is important to remember that someone can have a penis even if they don’t identify as a boy or a vulva even if they don’t identify as a girl. More inclusive language such as “a person with a penis” or “a person with a vulva” can also be used if you are comfortable with these terms.

STEP 6: … ask for one other volunteer and give them the “BIRTH CONTROL” page. Ask them to stand between the students holding the bouncy balls and the students with the “SPERM” pages and to physically block the two from meeting. Ask students, “What is the birth control doing?” Take some responses and make sure to tell students the following, “Birth control, if used correctly and consistently, prevents the sperm and egg from uniting by either blocking the sperm or preventing an egg from leaving the ovary.”

Resources from recommended site teensource.org

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